Materialize Documentation
Join the Community github/materialize

Temporal Filters

Temporal filters allow you to implement several windowing idioms (tumbling, hopping, and sliding), in addition to more nuanced temporal queries.

A “temporal filter” is a WHERE or HAVING clause which uses the function mz_logical_timestamp to represent the current time through which your data is viewed. Temporal filters have their own name because they are one of very few instances where you can materialize a view containing a function that changes on its own rather than as a result of changes to your data. Even if your input data does not change, your query results can change as the time represented by mz_logical_timestamp() changes.

Details

You can only use mz_logical_timestamp() to establish a temporal filter under the following conditions:

Let’s take a look at an example.

The SELECT query below uses one value of mz_logical_timestamp() to filter out records inserted after or deleted before that value, which is filled in with the time at which the query executes.

SELECT count(*)
FROM events
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= insert_ms
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < delete_ms;

The query counts events with insert_ms before or at the time represented by mz_logical_timestamp() and delete_ms after that time.

We can create a materialized view of the same query:

CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW active_events AS
SELECT count(*)
FROM events
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= insert_ms
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < delete_ms;

At each logical time, the view active_events contains exactly the results of the SELECT query above. As mz_logical_timestamp() moves forward in time, the events included change, newer events now meeting the time requirement and older events no longer doing so. You do not need to insert a deletion event and can rely on the query to maintain the result for you as time advances.

Windowing idioms

Temporal filters allow you to implement several windowing idioms for data that comes with logical timestamps. The patterns discussed below are all instances of temporal filters. Each pattern is a generalization of the last.

Tumbling windows

Tumbling windows are what we call windows when their duration equals their period (the amount of time before a new window begins). This creates fixed-size, contiguous, non-overlapping time intervals where each record belongs to exactly one interval.

Here we specify a tumbling window with the duration and period PERIOD_MS:

CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW tumbling AS
SELECT content, insert_ms
FROM events
-- The event should appear in only one interval of duration `PERIOD_MS`.
-- The interval begins here ...
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= PERIOD_MS * (insert_ms / PERIOD_MS)
-- ... and ends here.
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < PERIOD_MS * (1 + insert_ms / PERIOD_MS)

Tumbling windows are useful for maintaining constantly refreshed answers to questions like “How many orders did we receive during each hour of each day?”

Hopping windows

Hopping windows are windows whose duration is an integer multiple of their period. This creates fixed-size windows that may overlap, with records belonging to multiple windows.

NOTE: In some systems, these are called “sliding windows”. Materialize reserves that term for a different use case, discussed below.

Here we specify a hopping window that has the period PERIOD_MS and covers INTERVALS number of intervals:

CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW hopping AS
SELECT content, insert_ms
FROM events
-- The event should appear in `INTERVALS` intervals each of width `PERIOD_MS`.
-- The interval begins here ...
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= PERIOD_MS * (insert_ms / PERIOD_MS)
-- ... and ends here.
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < INTERVALS * (PERIOD_MS + insert_ms / PERIOD_MS)

Note that when INTERVALS is one, this query is identical to the query above it.

Sliding windows

NOTE: In some systems, “sliding windows” are used to mean windows whose duration is an integer multiple of their period. At Materialize, we call those “hopping windows” instead.

Sliding windows are windows whose period approaches the limit of 0. This creates fixed-size windows that appear to slide continuously forward in time. Records may belong to more than one interval.

Here we specify a sliding windows that has the duration INTERVAL_MS:

CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW sliding AS
SELECT content, insert_ms
FROM events
-- The event should appear inside the interval that begins at
-- `insert_ms` and ends at  `insert_ms + INTERVAL_MS`.
-- The interval begins here ..
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= insert_ms
-- ... and ends here.
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < insert_ms + INTERVAL_MS

Sliding windows are useful for maintaining the answers to questions like “How many orders did we get in the past five minutes?”

Grace periods

Obviously, a record must be present for it to pass a temporal filter. If a record is presented to Materialize at a time later than its insert_ms column (or the equivalent), it will only be included at the later time.

Streaming data often arrives just a bit later than intended. You can account for this in the temporal filter by introducing a grace period, adding a fixed amount to each expression you compare to mz_logical_timestamp().

If you think your data may arrive up to ten seconds late, you could add a grace period of ten seconds to each time. This holds back the production of correct answers by ten seconds, but does not omit data up to ten seconds late.

-- Use a grace period to allow for records as late as `GRACE_MS`.
CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW grace AS
SELECT content, insert_ms, delete_ms
FROM events
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= insert_ms + GRACE_MS
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < delete_ms + GRACE_MS;

Grace periods can be applied to any of the moving window idioms.

Example

For this example, you’ll need to create a sample data source and create a materialized view from it for later reference.

--Create a table of timestamped events.
CREATE TABLE events (
    content text,
    insert_ms numeric,
    delete_ms numeric
);

--Create a materialized view of events valid at a given logical time.
CREATE MATERIALIZED VIEW valid AS
SELECT content, insert_ms, delete_ms
FROM events
WHERE mz_logical_timestamp() >= insert_ms
  AND mz_logical_timestamp() < delete_ms;

Next, you’ll populate the table with timestamp data. The epoch extracted from now() is measured in seconds, so it’s multiplied by 1000 to match the milliseconds in mz_logical_timestamp().

INSERT INTO events VALUES (
    'hello',
    extract(epoch from now()) * 1000,
    (extract(epoch from now()) * 1000) + 100000
);
INSERT INTO events VALUES (
    'welcome',
    extract(epoch from now()) * 1000,
    (extract(epoch from now()) * 1000) + 150000
);
INSERT INTO events VALUES (
    'goodbye',
    (extract(epoch from now()) * 1000),
    (extract(epoch from now()) * 1000) + 200000
);

Then, before 100,000 ms (or 1.67 minutes) elapse, run the following query to see all the records:

SELECT *, mz_logical_timestamp() FROM valid;
 content |   insert_ms   |   delete_ms   | mz_logical_timestamp
---------+---------------+---------------+----------------------
 hello   | 1620853325858 | 1620853425858 |        1620853337180
 goodbye | 1620853325862 | 1620853525862 |        1620853337180
 welcome | 1620853325860 | 1620853475860 |        1620853337180
(3 rows)

If you run this query again after 1.67 minutes from the first insertion, you’ll see only two results, because the first result no longer satisfies the predicate.

Did this info help?
Yes No